What Endures

I JUST stumbled across this moment via Nowness late yesterday afternoon. Ed Ruscha taking a drive through memory — the land and soundscape of Los Angeles.

This is a subject that’s filtered through my mind a lot of late. Sometimes I hit a memory vein that is so rich it is almost unbearable.

From the piece:

“Almost more than the changes of the city I notice when things don’t change,” muses Ruscha. “Despite the huge development that is happening on Sunset Boulevard there is still a lot that is pretty much the way it was 50 years ago. There are concrete abutments, kerbing and certain peculiarities to the growth of a city that were there many years ago.”

To view the video and read the entire piece click here:

Every Street, Every Block

West Adams Terrace. Photo by Larry Underhill via L.A. Conservancy

… has a story …

This weekend, the Los Angeles Conservancy is offering a series of tours featuring historic neighborhoods in Los Angeles: Windsor Village, County Club Park, Wilshire Park are among them. As well the day-long event will offer sessions and workshops on sustainability, greening your home and balancing redevelopment and preservation.

And even if you can make it in the flesh, all of Los Angeles has been invited to participate in the discussion by using the hashtag, #LAStoryhood, to document the uniqueness of their own neighborhood in photographs via Twitter and Instagram… Looking forward to these personal virtual tours.

For more info on the project click here.

L.A.’s New Laureate

YESTERDAY, Luis J. Rodgriquez, was named Los Angeles’ second Poet Laureate, following Eloise Klein Healy’s abbreviated tenure. I’ve known Luis, like Eloise, for years wokring in the writers’ trenches, so this is particularly wonderful news.

I’m going to link to a piece from L.A. Weekly which shares a little bit about what Rodriguez plans to do in his tenure as the city’s poet.

Hearty congratulations, Luis!

Below some lines from his poem “Concrete River”:

We sink into the dust,
Baba and me,
Beneath brush of prickly leaves;
Ivy strangling trees–singing
Our last rites of locura.
Homeboys. Worshipping God-fumes
Out of spray cans.

Our backs press up against
A corrugated steel fence
Along the dried banks
Of a concrete river.
Spray-painted outpourings
On walls offer a chaos
Of color for the eyes.

you can read the rest here…

Photo: Kevin Scanlon via L.A. Weekly